Expert Views

Know the Signs

BEING ABLE TO RECOGNIZE A STROKE COULD HELP SAVE A LIFE

strokeBY GREG STARK

When it comes to spotting a stroke and getting help, time is of the essence. That’s because prompt treatment might make the difference between life and death — or the difference between a full recovery and long-term disability.

Being able to spot the signs of a stroke can help save valuable time. The easiest way to remember what to look for is to think F.A.S.T. — facial drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty, time to call 911.

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No Smoking Zone

RISING POPULARITY OF VAPE PENS HAS HEALTH OFFICIALS WORRIED

Smoking-ZoneBY MARK ANDERSON

Sarah answered the question quickly and emphatically: “No, I don’t vape, and I don’t plan to start. I see too many kids in my high school who are addicted to JUULs. They vape any way they can — in the bathroom, outside, even in class, when they hide the device up their sleeve.”

Sarah (not her real name) was among eight students who spoke during one of two recent meetings held at Hilton Head Christian Academy and May River High School on the health risks of e-cigarettes.

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Support System

Support-SystemWHEN SOMEONE YOU LOVE HAS A PROBLEM WITH ALCOHOL, HELP IS HERE

BY CAROL WEIR

When alcohol is ruining your family life, it’s hard to be optimistic about the future. In the Lowcountry, help is at hand and better days can be on the horizon. Al-Anon is a mutual support program for people whose lives have been affected by someone else’s drinking. By sharing common experiences and applying the Al-Anon principles, families and friends of alcoholics can bring positive changes to their individual situations, whether the alcoholic acknowledges the drinking problem or seeks help.

Many who come to Al-Anon are in despair, feeling hopeless, unable to believe that things can ever change. They come to Al-Anon because they want and need help. (more…)

Save your skin from the island sun

Stay-Cool2

VISITING AN ISLAND WITH A BRIGHT BLUE SKY AND WORLD-CLASS BEACHES CAN LEAD TO IRRATIONAL DECISION-MAKING. LIKE GOING OUTSIDE UNPROTECTED FROM THE SUN.

Summer on Hilton Head Island is ideal for swimming, boating, golfing, riding bicycles and horses, fishing and frolicking in the surf. But even a few minutes of the island’s sun can cause skin damage.

Ultraviolet rays accounted for 80 percent of skin aging in a recent study of almost 300 women published in the Journal of Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology.

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Stay Cool

MANY AREN’T AWARE OF THE DANGERS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION AND HEAT STROKE

Stay-CoolWalking along the sandy shore, splashing in the waves, boating in Calibogue Sound – adventures abound in the Lowcountry. But it’s important to be aware that sunburn isn’t the only risk from spending hours outdoors. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke also can cause problems. Heat exhaustion happens when the body overheats. According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms include:

  • • Heavy sweating
  • • Rapid pulse
  • • Dizziness
  • • Fatigue
  • • Cool, moist skin with goose bumps when in the heat
  • • Muscle cramps
  • • Dark urine
  • • Nausea
  • • Headache

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The Eyes Have It

FIVE TIPS TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR EYES

eyesBY TIM HORTON

As the U.S. population ages, the number of Americans with major eye diseases is increasing, and vision loss is becoming a major public health problem, the National Eye Institute says.

By the year 2020, the number of people who are blind or have low vision is projected to increase substantially, according to the Archives of Ophthalmology. Blindness or low vision affects 3.3 million Americans age 40 and older, or one in 28, according to recent studies. This figure is projected to reach 5.5 million by the year 2020. (more…)

Run for it

EXPERTS SAY RUNNING CAN HELP BOOST HEALTH

runBY MOLLY ANDERSON

Running for even five to 10 minutes a day, once or twice a week, or at slow speeds is associated with substantial mortality benefits over 15 years, a recent study showed.

Runners overall had 30 percent and 45 percent lower adjusted risks of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, over that period and added three years to their life expectancy compared with non-runners, according to Dr. Duckchul Lee of Iowa State University.

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