Run for it

EXPERTS SAY RUNNING CAN HELP BOOST HEALTH

runBY MOLLY ANDERSON

Running for even five to 10 minutes a day, once or twice a week, or at slow speeds is associated with substantial mortality benefits over 15 years, a recent study showed.

Runners overall had 30 percent and 45 percent lower adjusted risks of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, over that period and added three years to their life expectancy compared with non-runners, according to Dr. Duckchul Lee of Iowa State University.

And the study found runners didn’t need to run marathons to see health benefits. Even running less than 60 minutes a week — an average of about eight minutes a day — helped lower mortality rates, Lee said. The same is true for running short distances and at slow speeds, according to the study.

“This study may motivate healthy but sedentary individuals to begin and continue running for substantial and attainable mortality benefits,” Lee and colleagues said.

And the study found runners didn’t need to run marathons to see health benefits. Even running less than 60 minutes a week — an average of about eight minutes a day — helped lower mortality rates, Lee said. The same is true for running short distances and at slow speeds, according to the study.

“This study may motivate healthy but sedentary individuals to begin and continue running for substantial and attainable mortality benefits,” Lee and colleagues said.